National Policy Institute on Emergency Preparedness and Response Management - NALEO Educational Fund

About


September 14-15, 2018 | Miami, FL


In 2017, the United States experienced a significant number of natural and man-made disasters. In total, the United States was impacted by 16 separate natural events, that according to a report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, caused $306 billion in total damages across the country, making 2017 the most expensive year on record for natural disasters in our nation’s history. While natural disasters continue to increase in frequency and strength, man-made catastrophes have also shown a similar pattern. These types of disasters also had a record breaking year, with 346 mass shooting incidents across the country, marking 2017 as the deadliest year for mass shootings. These disasters have great economic and societal impacts on communities, making it even more critical for jurisdictions to revisit and update their emergency plans on a regular basis.

Effective emergency and disaster response planning entails an ongoing process of updating response and recovery plans, responding to local, state, and federal policy changes, an updated understanding of hazards, and implementation of best practices and lessons learned. Local policymakers have the opportunity to play a leadership role in these efforts by facilitating and supporting collaboration across levels of government and helping to establish key partnerships across sectors before a disaster occurs in order to advance disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.

NALEO Educational Fund’s National Policy Institute on Emergency Preparedness and Response Management will provide Latino policymakers with the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the different levels of planning and preparedness in an effort to help their communities prepare for, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from various types of disasters and emergencies.

The Policy Institute’s curriculum will cover: 

  • Natural and Man Made Disasters in 2017: The Cost, Impact on Communities and Lessons Learned
  • Communications During a Disaster
  • Mass Evacuation – A Well-Coordinated Plan Saves Lives
  • Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Healthcare Facilities
  • The Aftermath: Recovery, Resiliency and Rebuilding
  • Hazard Mitigation Planning: A Look at Land Use Planning
  • Census 2020: Natural Disasters and the U.S. Census
  • Best Practices for Improving Emergency Plans and Preparedness for Natural and Man Made Disasters
The Policy Institute will convene local policymakers with leading experts from the public, private, and non-profit sectors for two days of professional development that combines classroom and experiential learning, and to exchange ideas and best practices. Policymakers will receive timely information, strengthen governance skills that support effective leadership, and will have the opportunity to network with colleagues and experts from throughout the country.

Sponsors


Title Sponsor



Investor Sponsor

Tenet Healthcare

For more information please contact:

Martha Beal

Membership Services Manager
NALEO Educational Fund
Tel: (213) 747-7606 ext 4430
Email: mbeall@naleo.org

Schedule


7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Registration and Breakfast


8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Welcome Remarks and Program Overview


8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Session I:

Natural and Man Made Disasters in 2017: The Cost, Impact on Communities, and Lessons Learned


Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, combined with devastating wildfires in the West and other natural and man-made catastrophes, made 2017 the most expensive and deadliest year on record for natural disasters and mass shootings in the United States. The impact these events have on communities cuts across all levels - from loss of life, disruption to household income and housing, to access to healthcare. This session will provide an overview of the impact these events had in many communities across the country and territories, including Puerto Rico. This discussion will also highlight lessons learned and best practices on how communities prepared, responded and are recovering from these events.

10:15 a.m. – 11:45 p.m.

Session II:

Communications during a Disaster


A reliable system network and a well-coordinated communications plan can be lifesavers during emergencies. Appropriate and accurate communication during an emergency can help prevent panic, coordinate response among first responders and stakeholders, reach vulnerable and at-risk populations, and mobilize needed resources. This session will provide an overview of the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) system. Participants will also learn about various communications strategies jurisdictions use to maintain and share critical information when a disaster strikes.

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Roundtable Strategy Discussion

These facilitated roundtable discussions will provide participants the opportunity to delve deeper, and further discuss the content presented by experts from their respective roles as policymakers. Participants will identify and discuss how they can ensure their communities efficiently prepare, respond and recover from these events.

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Lunch


1:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Session III:

Mass Evacuation: A Well-Coordinated Plan Saves Lives


When implemented effectively, evacuations are an important strategy to protect lives. Each call for evacuation, like each disaster, is unique. Conducting a safe evacuation that protects citizens, businesses, and properties requires effective coordination and communication as well as decisive action. Poor handling of a mass evacuation has the potential to become a disaster unto itself. This session will provide participants with a better understanding of the types of events that might require mass evacuation, and the different elements that should be considered during an evacuation, including multijurisdictional and agency coordination, public communications, traffic control, sheltering and mass care.

3:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Session IV:

Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Healthcare Facilities


When catastrophes like mass shootings, hurricanes, and earthquakes happen and lives are at stake, communities rely on healthcare providers and facilities. For these facilities, an emergency is any event that affects their ability to provide care. After the most recent events in 2017, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is expanding compliance requirements for hospitals and emergency preparedness. This session will provide policymakers with an understanding of best practices and guidelines that healthcare providers use to better develop and maintain policies, procedures, communication plans, training and testing to ensure the critical functions that allow them to continue to provide critical medical care are in place.

4:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Roundtable Strategy Discussion

These facilitated roundtable discussions will provide participants the opportunity to delve deeper, and further discuss the content presented by experts from their respective roles as policymakers. Participants will identify and discuss how they can ensure their communities efficiently prepare, respond and recover from these events.
7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Registration and Breakfast


8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Session V:

The Aftermath: Recovery, Resiliency and Rebuilding


When disaster strikes, the immediate concern of all responders is the safety, and the mental and physical well-being of those affected. They also work to meet basic and urgent needs like food, water, shelter and critical services. Response and recovery efforts in those early days and weeks following a disaster can drastically impact the speed and sustainability of community recovery and resiliency. This session will provide an overview of effective strategies communities can implement in advance in order to respond and recover more effectively and efficiently after disaster strikes.

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Session VI:

Hazard Mitigation Planning: A Look at Land Use Planning


A successful effort to plan and prepare for a disaster includes an updated knowledge of the hazards a particular community is prone to and the impact they can have. Communities face a number of threats, therefore, it is crucial to develop a sustained course of action to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and property. Having an updated Hazard Mitigation Plan creates a risk-based decision-making framework for policymakers to reduce damage to people, property and the economy from future emergencies and disasters. This session will provide an overview of effective strategies for hazard mitigation, with a particular focus on land use planning.

11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.

Luncheon Presentation:

Census 2020 – Make it Count!


Natural Disasters and the U.S. Census

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Session VII:

Best Practices for Improving Emergency Plans and Preparedness for Natural and Man-made Disasters


This session will provide participants with the opportunity to put into practice the critical elements experts presented on emergency planning, preparation, mitigation, and recovery from all types emergencies, including active shooter events. 

3:00 p.m. – 3:05 p.m.

Evaluations


3:05 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Open Floor Discussion Strategy Wrap-up and Closing Remarks

Contact


213-747-7606

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