NALEO National Policy Institute on Emergency Response and Management - NALEO Educational Fund

About


September 13-14, 2019 | Long Beach, CA


According to a report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, natural disasters cost the country $91 billion in 2018. While natural disasters continue to increase in frequency and strength, man-made catastrophes have also shown a similar pattern. It is not a matter of if, but when a disaster will happen in your local community. Are you prepared? All disasters start and end locally and actions taken before and right after an emergency are critical and can save lives. The safety and well-being of people during and after an emergency depend on how prepared your community is and on how you as a leader respond to a crisis. The public expects elected officials to be at the forefront of response and recovery efforts; and to provide direction and reassurance.

NALEO Educational Fund’s National Policy Institute on Emergency Response and Management will provide Latino policymakers with the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the different levels of planning and preparedness in an effort to help their communities prepare for, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from various types of disasters and emergencies.

This Institute will feature one day of general sessions for all participants, and a second day broken out into tracks – one for municipal/county officials and the other for school board members and college trustees. The curriculum is designed for participants who have not previously participated in a NALEO Policy Institute on emergency preparedness and response. The Institute’s curriculum will cover:

General Sessions:

  • Who is in Charge of What? Understanding Local, State and Federal and Roles during Emergencies
  • Identifying the Hazards and Multi-Jurisdictional Mitigation Planning
  • Communications and Mass Evacuation during a Disaster
  • Housing and Education Needs for Displaced Residents
  • Best Practices-Scenario Exercises

Municipal/County Track:

  • Emergency Planning for the Elderly and other Vulnerable Populations
  • Supporting the Needs of Emergency First Responders

Education Track:

  • School Campus Safety and Violence
  • Recovery and Strengthening Resilience for Schools and Students
The Policy Institute will convene policymakers from the school board, municipal and county levels of office with leading experts from the public, private, and non-profit sectors for two days of professional development that combines classroom and experiential learning, and an exchange of ideas and best practices. Policymakers will receive timely information, strengthen governance skills that support effective leadership, and will have the opportunity to network with colleagues and experts from throughout the country.

Sponsors


Title Sponsor



Investor Sponsors


For more information please contact:

Monica Medina

Program Coordinator
NALEO Educational Fund
Tel: (213) 747-7606 ext 143
Email: mmedina@naleo.org

Schedule


7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Registration & Breakfast


8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Welcome Remarks and Program Overview


8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.


Session I:

Who is in Charge of What? Understanding Local, State and Federal and Roles during Emergencies


Emergency response begins at the local level, but when local resources become overwhelmed, it is the state’s role to ensure a well-coordinated response through the combined efforts of local government, state and federal agencies, and private sector. Understanding the scope of federal and state emergency authorities and how they interact is an important part of preparing for and responding to any type of emergency. This session will provide participants with an understanding of the critical role that federal, state, and local governments play in emergency planning and response.

10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Session II:

Identifying the Hazards and Multi-Jurisdictional Mitigation Planning


A successful effort to plan and prepare for a disaster includes an updated knowledge of the hazards that can impact a particular community. Communities face a number of threats, therefore it is crucial to develop a sustained course of action to reduce or when possible eliminate long-term risk to people and property. A multi-jurisdictional hazard mitigation plan enables comprehensive mitigation approaches to reduce risks that affect a region; an updated plan creates a shared framework for risk-based decision-making and resource allocation to reduce damages to people, property and the economy from future emergencies or disasters. This session will provide an overview of effective strategies for multi-jurisdiction hazard mitigation planning.

11:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Roundtable Strategy Discussion

These roundtable discussions will provide participants the opportunity to delve deeper and further discuss the content presented by the experts and from their respective roles as policymakers identify and discuss how they can engage in these issues to help their communities prepare for, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from various types of disasters and emergencies.

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Luncheon Program:

¡Hágase Contar! Census Campaign Resources and Tools



1:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Session III:

Communications and Mass Evacuation during a Disaster


A well-coordinated communications and evacuation plan can be lifesavers during emergencies. Appropriate and accurate communication during an emergency or evacuation can help prevent panic, coordinate response among first responders and stakeholders, reach vulnerable and at-risk populations, and mobilize needed resources. This session will provide an overview of the Emergency Alerts System and communication strategies jurisdictions use to maintain and share critical information. Participants will also learn about the types of events that might require a mass evacuation and the different elements that should be considered during an evacuation, including multi-jurisdictional and agency coordination.

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Roundtable Strategy Discussion

These roundtable discussions will provide participants the opportunity to delve deeper and further discuss the content presented by the experts and from their respective roles as policymakers identify and discuss how they can engage in these issues to help their communities prepare for, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from various types of disasters and emergencies.

3:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Session IV:

Housing and Education Needs for Displaced Residents


A top priority after a disaster is making sure that all displaced families have a safe, accessible, and affordable place to live while they get back on their feet. Housing is essential to the economic, social and psychological recovery after a disaster; equally as important are schools. Schools are also an integral part of recovery efforts. Children in crisis benefit from the sense of normalcy provided by going to school, therefore, reopening schools, when safe, should also be one of the primary priorities of disaster relief efforts. This session will highlight strategies that can support long-term housing needs for displaced families and best practices for schools to provide additional support students affected by disaster.

4:45 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Roundtable Strategy Discussion

These roundtable discussions will provide participants the opportunity to delve deeper and further discuss the content presented by the experts and from their respective roles as policymakers identify and discuss how they can engage in these issues to help their communities prepare for, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from various types of disasters and emergencies.

5:00 p.m. – 5:10 p.m.

Evaluation


5:10 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Closing Remarks


5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Opening Reception


7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Registration & Breakfast


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Concurrent Sessions

Participants may choose which session to attend

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8:30 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

Session V:

Municipal and County Track: Emergency Planning for the Elderly and other Vulnerable Populations


Natural disasters can disproportionately impact the elderly population. Older adults are more prone to physical or mental limitations that make it difficult to seek assistance or evacuate. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, when Katrina hit, more than 70 percent of the storm’s victims in Louisiana were over the age of 60; and about three out of every four Americans 65 and older have multiple chronic health conditions, making these population especially challenging to assist and care for during an emergency. This session will provide an overview of the challenges the elderly and other vulnerable population’s face during natural disasters and will highlight best practices for local governments and key stakeholders to incorporate into their emergency plans.


Session V:

Education Track: Creating Safer School Campuses


An alarming number of acts of violence are being committed on school grounds all across America, from schools in rural communities to campuses in large metropolitan cities. These acts of violence can range from bullying to mass shootings. During this session policymakers will receive an overview of the different acts of violence schools are susceptible to and will learn best practices to improve school safety and create a safer learning environment for students and educators.

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Concurrent Sessions

Participants may choose which session to attend

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10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Session VI:

Municipal and County Track: Supporting the Needs and Well-being of Emergency First Responders


First responders play a vital role in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from disasters. They are also the first to reach out to disaster survivors and provide emotional and physical support to them. These duties, although essential to the entire community, are strenuous to first responders, and with time put them at an increased risk of trauma. According to a recent study conducted by Harris Poll for the University of Phoenix, 85 percent of first responders reported symptoms of psychological trauma, and one-third had a clinical diagnosis of depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. This session will provide an overview of the challenges first responders face as natural and man-made disasters continue to increase in frequency. The discussion will include best practices policymakers can support toward the well-being of men and women on the front lines of emergencies.


Session VI:

Education Track: Supporting Recovery and Strengthening Resilience for Schools and Students


Children caught in natural or man-made disasters can suffer from trauma and bereavement far longer than adults realize. These experiences have an affect not only on how well they perform at school but also throughout the trajectory of their lives. This session will provide policymakers with a better understanding of how children’s social and emotional health after a disaster impacts their academic performance. The discussion will also highlight best practices policymakers and school administrators can develop before a disaster strikes to support a long-term recovery plan that addresses shelter, counseling and education needs of their students, as well as their own recovery efforts.

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Roundtable Strategy Discussion

These roundtable discussions will provide participants the opportunity to delve deeper and further discuss the content presented by the experts and from their respective roles as policymakers identify and discuss how they can engage in these issues to help their communities prepare for, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from various types of disasters and emergencies.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch


1:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Best Practices: Scenario Exercises

This session will provide participants with the opportunity to put into practice the critical elements around emergency response and management.

3:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Evaluations


3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Closing Remarks


Contact


213-747-7606

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